26C / 80F

November-April

28C / 84F

May-October

Find your way

Barbados and St Lucia are the two major airports that serve the Grenadines. The Mustique Company owns and maintains the four Twin Otter aircraft that are operated by Air Adelphi – they fly between Barbados and Mustique (44 minutes) and St. Lucia and Mustique (22 minutes). Mustique Airways and SVG, based in St. Vincent, also operate charter services. Antoinette of the Mustique Company (1 784 458 4748 or airport@mustique.vc) will make all the arrangements for transfers and charters from and to Mustique, Barbados and St. Lucia.

The island

Mustique is one of the islands in the Grenadine chain of the West Indies. While only about five kilometers long and one and a half kilometers at its widest, its hilly terrain and indented bays have created a varied terrain and microclimate. It makes walking around the island endlessly interesting. Privately owned and managed with care, the concern for security, health, the landscape, recreation, food and beverage supply, shopping, dining out and well-being, means that every aspect of a superlative vacation is ensured. There is a wonderful doctor and clinic, communal tennis courts, riding, snorkeling, scuba diving, café and a spa.

As Mustique is only 12 ½ o north of the equator, the temperature variation between winter (80oF or 26oC) and summer (84oF or 28oC) is small, so it is a great place to visit all year round.

Wildlife

There is a wide variety of bird species on the island – humming birds, tropic mocking birds, banana quits, herons, boobies, frigate birds, pelicans, grackles and more. Charming geckos abound and there are rare glimpses of the large, lime green, very shy, iguanas. There are no poisonous snakes or spiders on the island. (However the manchineel tree, particularly its fruit, is poisonous. A Holly looking tree, known as Brasil, can cause a reaction like that of poison ivy). Red footed tortoises can be seen everywhere. At certain times of the year very large leatherback turtles flail ashore to lay eggs, bury them and swim off to sea.

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Beach

Simplicity is the only house on Pasture Bay, which has an 800 metre long coral-sand beach. Macaroni beach, the most popular, is a 10-minute walk along the waterfront path. Lagoon and L'Ansecoy beaches are also excellent swimming beaches, easily reached in a Simplicity Kawasaki Mule.

See all Mustique Beaches

A Brief History

COLONIAL ERA

Colonial rivalries made the Caribbean a cockpit for European wars for centuries. Portuguese, Spanish, English, Dutch and French claimed Central and South American territories and the islands of the Caribbean. The French colonized St. Lucia (1643), Grenada (1649), Dominica (1715) and St. Vincent, including Mustique (1719). After the Seven Year War France ceded Grenada, Dominica and St. Vincent, including Mustique, to Britain in 1763.

The Caribbean was known for pirates – the term "buccaneer" was used to describe a pirate operating in the region. It was the pirates who named the Leeward Islands the Grenadines.

Until the 19th Century Europeans grew sugarcane profitably on the islands. However, the development of sugar beet in Europe as a substitute for sugar cane, devastated the sugar industry of the Caribbean. Mustique's sugar plantations were abandoned. Cotton was grown for a while – the main structure of the Cotton House hotel was a cotton barn. This industry too was abandoned, and the island became derelict but for a few herders.

 

 

 

MODERN ERA

Mustique was purchased in 1958 by Lord Glenconner and the development of the island as a special tropical holiday destination began. Subsequently, in 1989 the Mustique Company was formed, led by Hans Neuman and a handful of homeowners, who purchased the island from Lord Glenconnor. Simplicity was one of the original shareholder group.

It is this company that now manages the Island and its sophisticated utility infrastructure and amenities. The Board of the Mustique Company is elected from home-owning shareholders.

Today Mustique retains its natural beauty and tranquility, protecting the natural environment and offering guests one of the most secure and pristine islands in the world.